MAD Perspectives Blog

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 The Marriage of Data and Storytelling

Peggy Dau - Tuesday, July 08, 2014

A few weeks ago I wrote about finding the story in the data. This relationship between data and storytelling continues to evolve as increasing amounts of data are available to us. Domo released an enlightening info graphic that exclaims that Twitter users tweet 277,00 times and that Apple users download 48,000 app severy minute of every day. These are just few examples shared in the infographic, which reflects that data never sleeps. With its chronic insomnia, data provides an unending source of stories to entice, educate, elucidate, engage or enrage readers. 

Even as big data is on the cusp of entering the trough of disillusionment phase of Gartner's Hype Cycle, data will continue to be the source of validation for all levels of business strategy and the stories we tell to explain those strategies. Our stories take the form of quarterly earnings, product announcements, R&D proposals, go-to-market programs and customer experience initiatives. The data, that we collect from internal and external sources, structure and unstructured, serves to support those stories. Data and story are intrinsically bound until death do they part.

Of course in any marriage there are supporting cast members. At this wedding, the maid of honor is social media. She provides context in the form of voluntary updates. She can be emotional, repetitive, succinct, and pragmatic. She adds color to the story and sometimes is the instigator of the story. On the other side of the aisle is mobility. He is the enabler of location based data, subscriber data and usage data. He provides a different kind of context to big data, delivering the insight that allows big data and storytelling to target their efforts even more specifically. By bringing these players together and consolidating the value each of them provides, we move closer to the using data prescriptively. Understanding the context of the data is, for now, the secret sauce. This allows our stories to not only share what and when something is happening, but why. We will be able to suggest better solutions for our customers because we will more fully understand the issues that are enablers versus those that are inhibitors to healthy relationships.

Stories have been a key element of all business, from those that introduce a new norm (Ford), found a business segment (HP, IBM), challenge the norm (Apple, Google) or provide new ways to connect (Bell Labs, Facebook). All stories have a common foundation, data - about the market, the product and the opportunity. Data can exist without story, but its value would not be appreciated. What's your story?

What's your perspective?